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Interview

You may not have heard of April Hudson, but if you are looking to break away from the daily grind of corporate America and venture out on your own her story will inspire you. She spent ten years in the corporate environment for a fortune 500 company in the energy industry. She had a job that many people would envy, a great salary, great benefits, a 401 K and a retirement plan (not something offered these days by many employers. The company she worked for was a great place to work and she loved her co-workers, even considered many of them family, and her prospects for career growth looked great. Yet even with such a great career there was something that did not feel quite right. Every morning she would rush out the door and leave her 2 small children, often when they were still asleep, or put them still asleep in the car and drop them off crying at daycare. When she came home at night it was usually with just enough time to feed them and put them back to bed. In fact she felt as if the baby sitter spent more time with her children than she did. For many people this is simply “how things are” but April felt that this was a very un-natural way to live. One day she decided that despite having such a wonderful career that she was actually just surviving and very unhappy with how things were. She wanted to raise her own kids and have the freedom to take an afternoon off if she wanted. She wanted her time to be relaxing and about more than just cooking and cleaning and preparing for crazy hectic week to come.  April did something that so few people in the corporate world ever do, she decided to use the sliver of free-time available to her looking for ways to liberate herself from the bondage of the 6AM-6PM grind. Along with her husband she decided to create a video learning series with their children during their free time and is now a successful entrepreneur. Here is April’s story and how she met the challenge to leverage her spare time to create a fit for purpose life.

Did you find the transition from Corporate America to entrepreneurship — both making the decision and actually doing it — difficult?

The most challenging part for me was making the space and time to work during my off hours. Being a working mom of two small children I felt a lot of guilt in spending time away from my children after I came home from work. Making a decision to reduce the already short period of time I was allotted with my children was difficult for me. Once I made that decision it was equally difficult to stick with it as I felt the constant pull from my children and practical daily responsibilities of being a household manager pulling me away from my goals. Because of this challenge I failed at many home businesses before I found one that worked for me. Once I got really clear on what I wanted I realized that the only way I was going to stay motivated was to do something that would not take my time away from my children and still allow me to create an income that was secure enough to leave my corporate job. Even after I matched my pay from my regular job it was still difficult to give up the security of a steady pay check, paid vacation, and the idea of retirement pay. It took a leap of faith and tremendous courage to realize that there are no guarantees, especially in Corporate America, and that the true security was trusting in myself and a higher power.

How does it feel to have accomplished becoming your own boss?

 

I have to say that this is the happiest I have ever been. Once I made the decision to take charge of my own life and really look for ideas I could do on my own I felt free. I took some time to really get clear on my goals for myself and use my time wisely. Then I took action and it was as if the universe lined up the opportunities, resources and methods to make my plans a reality.

What does a typical day look like for you now that you own your own business?

I usually wake up between 3-4AM just as I did when I worked at a “real job”. The difference is now that I am not rushing and stressing. I enjoy my early mornings, usig this time to exercise, meditate and plan my day. I work on my projects for my company for about 2 hours then I make breakfast and wake my boys up. It is so enjoyable to feed my children a home cooked breakfast and have the luxury of eating with them. Such a simple thing but one I enjoy so much now that I am able to do so. After my children are off to school I continue my work day for another 3-4 hours and then I have my own free time to read or just enjoy a cup of tea before picking up my children from school. I feel so empowered as a mother to have the ability to pick my own children up from school and really get the opportunity to engage with their teachers and help them with their homework. When I worked at my corporate job I relied on reports from a baby sitter or a frustrating chain of emails to communicate with teachers. Most nights I make a home cooked meal, no more rushed fast food or processed microwaved dinners, I have plenty of time to make real food and make sure my family eats healthy. We eat din

You may not have heard of April Hudson, but if you are looking to break away from the daily grind of corporate America and venture out on your own her story will inspire you. She spent ten years in the corporate environment for a fortune 500 company in the energy industry. She had a job that many people would envy, a great salary, great benefits, a 401 K and a retirement plan (not something offered these days by many employers. The company she worked for was a great place to work and she loved her co-workers, even considered many of them family, and her prospects for career growth looked great. Yet even with such a great career there was something that did not feel quite right. Every morning she would rush out the door and leave her 2 small children, often when they were still asleep, or put them still asleep in the car and drop them off crying at daycare. When she came home at night it was usually with just enough time to feed them and put them back to bed. In fact she felt as if the baby sitter spent more time with her children than she did. For many people this is simply “how things are” but April felt that this was a very un-natural way to live. One day she decided that despite having such a wonderful career that she was actually just surviving and very unhappy with how things were. She wanted to raise her own kids and have the freedom to take an afternoon off if she wanted. She wanted her time to be relaxing and about more than just cooking and cleaning and preparing for crazy hectic week to come.  April did something that so few people in the corporate world ever do, she decided to use the sliver of free-time available to her looking for ways to liberate herself from the bondage of the 6AM-6PM grind. Along with her husband she decided to create a video learning series with their children during their free time and is now a successful entrepreneur. Here is April’s story and how she met the challenge to leverage her spare time to create a fit for purpose life.

Did you find the transition from Corporate America to entrepreneurship — both making the decision and actually doing it — difficult?

The most challenging part for me was making the space and time to work during my off hours. Being a working mom of two small children I felt a lot of guilt in spending time away from my children after I came home from work. Making a decision to reduce the already short period of time I was allotted with my children was difficult for me. Once I made that decision it was equally difficult to stick with it as I felt the constant pull from my children and practical daily responsibilities of being a household manager pulling me away from my goals. Because of this challenge I failed at many home businesses before I found one that worked for me. Once I got really clear on what I wanted I realized that the only way I was going to stay motivated was to do something that would not take my time away from my children and still allow me to create an income that was secure enough to leave my corporate job. Even after I matched my pay from my regular job it was still difficult to give up the security of a steady pay check, paid vacation, and the idea of retirement pay. It took a leap of faith and tremendous courage to realize that there are no guarantees, especially in Corporate America, and that the true security was trusting in myself and a higher power.

How does it feel to have accomplished becoming your own boss?

 

I have to say that this is the happiest I have ever been. Once I made the decision to take charge of my own life and really look for ideas I could do on my own I felt free. I took some time to really get clear on my goals for myself and use my time wisely. Then I took action and it was as if the universe lined up the opportunities, resources and methods to make my plans a reality.

What does a typical day look like for you now that you own your own business?

I usually wake up between 3-4AM just as I did when I worked at a “real job”. The difference is now that I am not rushing and stressing. I enjoy my early mornings, usig this time to exercise, meditate and plan my day. I work on my projects for my company for about 2 hours then I make breakfast and wake my boys up. It is so enjoyable to feed my children a home cooked breakfast and have the luxury of eating with them. Such a simple thing but one I enjoy so much now that I am able to do so. After my children are off to school I continue my work day for another 3-4 hours and then I have my own free time to read or just enjoy a cup of tea before picking up my children from school. I feel so empowered as a mother to have the ability to pick my own children up from school and really get the opportunity to engage with their teachers and help them with their homework. When I worked at my corporate job I relied on reports from a baby sitter or a frustrating chain of emails to communicate with teachers. Most nights I make a home cooked meal, no more rushed fast food or processed microwaved dinners, I have plenty of time to make real food and make sure my family eats healthy. We eat dinner together every night and we are able to visit and enjoy each other’s company. My ‘job’ fits my life rather than trying to squeeze life in around my job.

ner together every night and we are able to visit and enjoy each other’s company. My ‘job’ fits my life rather than trying to squeeze life in around my job.